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Author Topic: CWD update: NIH study on prion transmission via plants  (Read 1161 times)

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Dire Wolf

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CWD update: NIH study on prion transmission via plants
« on: January 13, 2017, 12:22:20 PM »

This is really being scrutinized in Lansing. Basically, its implications are specific to restrictions on cereal grains being fed at captive deer facilities. In the broader scope, it may bring about some marked restrictions on bait distribution and transport and baiting of deer.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4449294/
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Dire Wolf

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Re: CWD update: NIH study on prion transmission via plants
« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2017, 12:47:34 PM »

This is really being scrutinized in Lansing. Basically, its implications are specific to restrictions on cereal grains being fed at captive deer facilities. In the broader scope, it may bring about some marked restrictions on bait distribution and transport and baiting of deer.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4449294/

Here is some additional background and discussion on risks, both to humans and wildlife:
http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2015/06/researchers-make-surprising-discovery-about-spread-of-chronic-wasting-disease/#.WHkQC31QYfI
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Al the Infidel

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Re: CWD update: NIH study on prion transmission via plants
« Reply #2 on: January 14, 2017, 06:19:04 AM »

This is really being scrutinized in Lansing. Basically, its implications are specific to restrictions on cereal grains being fed at captive deer facilities. In the broader scope, it may bring about some marked restrictions on bait distribution and transport and baiting of deer.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4449294/

Here is some additional background and discussion on risks, both to humans and wildlife:
http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2015/06/researchers-make-surprising-discovery-about-spread-of-chronic-wasting-disease/#.WHkQC31QYfI

The first study(?) was about as dry a read as they come Wolf.  roll()

Has anyone tested feed corn many of us use for the nasty prions? 
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Al Johnson~ SEMPER FI

Dire Wolf

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Re: CWD update: NIH study on prion transmission via plants
« Reply #3 on: January 14, 2017, 08:26:12 AM »

Al, I included the first study because it outlines how the researchers tied prions and prion uptake(stems and leaves, stems and leaves) to prion transmission to study animals. So, if you feed alfalfa, particularly along the Wisconsin border counties, you might want to make sure it is a local cutting product.

Basic internal plant physiology is pretty standardized.  The issue to be determined is whether prions accumulate in quantity in the plant fruit (Corn, apples) or in sugar beet roots, or potato tubers. Since prions can't be easily destroyed and persist in soil for years, this study adds another layer of information on potential routes (vectors) of transmission beyond nose-to-nose contact(horizontal transmission), which is the accepted principal route of CWD transmission, based on current data. There is some evidence of mother-to-fetus transmission (vertical transmission) as well.

I spent some time in the Mount Horeb, Wi.(initial CWD outbreak site) area this past spring on the way back from a trip to Kansas to pick-up a labrador pup;extensive farmland with a LOT of roll to it. They shot the deer population back to pretty close to zero, yet the disease incidence persists. Another potential transmission vector, since prions persist intact and functional in soil, particularly clay laden soils(think eastern U.P.) is the possibility of UTV/ATV traffic, as well as trucks and cars driving down farm lanes and in fields and traveling to northern Wisconsin or the U.P. to hunt or for recreation use.

The bigger issue is what initiates prion folding, which initiates disease onset. Some folks are looking at Alzheimer models and research for insight, since the amyloid plaques that build-up around the synaptic junction are quite similar to prions.

I sent these on to Terry Minzey, MDNR Wildlife Div., Region 1 supervisor, and Ashley Autenrieth, Region 1 and 2, Whitetail Management Specialist, for comment...

Sure makes me feel good that the Michigan Legislature watered-down the wording on baiting cessation related to proximity of CWD incidence in northeastern Wisconsin.

This is the most current discussion I could find on baiting and CWD in Michigan...

http://www.detroitnews.com/story/news/local/michigan/2016/11/27/deer-baiting-targeted-chronic-wasting-disease/94500986/
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Al the Infidel

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Re: CWD update: NIH study on prion transmission via plants
« Reply #4 on: January 14, 2017, 03:18:41 PM »

Thanks for the link Wolf. I see the jist of it is relatively the same.  My preferred bait is locally grown potatoes, best bang for the buck.
I'm a Wiki fan, regardless of the incidental misinformation.
Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) of mule deer, white-tailed deer, elk (or "wapiti"), and moose ("elk" in Europe). As of 2016, CWD had only been found in members of the deer family.[1] First recognized as a clinical "wasting" syndrome in 1967 in mule deer in a wildlife research facility in northern Colorado, USA, it was identified as a TSE in 1978 and has spread to free-ranging and captive populations in 23 US states and two Canadian provinces.[2] CWD is typified by chronic weight loss leading to death. No relationship is known between CWD and any other TSE of animals or people. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chronic_wasting_disease

I swear biologists and lawyers get paid by the word with bonus points for bio symbols.  censor()
More dry read in my search of mutation info.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4097672/

I majored in biology, english and math until I got tired of stuffing my head and after 1.5 yrs at Northern headed off to war.
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Al Johnson~ SEMPER FI

Dire Wolf

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Re: CWD update: NIH study on prion transmission via plants
« Reply #5 on: January 15, 2017, 07:19:10 AM »

Basically, the authors are stating they have identified the prion type that causes CWD.  Scientists have not determined how many variants there are; therefore there are an unknown range of different prion strains that cause CWD as a fulminant disease (animals get sick and eventually die).  They used transgenic mice to isolate two specific strains of infectious prions. Elk, when exposed propogated identical infectious prions to the one they were initially exposed to, while deer did not.  They identify the specific site on the deer prion's amino acid sequence that varied when it was replicated within the host to the non-stable form.

What they don't provide evidence to support or refute is whether any of the variant infectious prions formed by the infected deer, while they remained alive, can be passed to man to cause disease. What the data do support is that prion replication variants are produced by the infected deer in their study,theoretically potentially broadening the array of infectious prion strains in host animals, plants and soils at an infection site.
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Dire Wolf

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Re: CWD update: NIH study on prion transmission via plants
« Reply #6 on: January 15, 2017, 07:38:15 AM »

Basically, the authors are stating they have identified the prion type that causes CWD.  Scientists have not determined how many variants there are; therefore there are an unknown range of different prion strains that cause CWD as a fulminant disease (animals get sick and eventually die). They also state that prion variant formation routes, other than via nucleic acid sequence interchange (remember NAs in triplet sequence encode for a specific amino acid and this sequential array of amino acids when bond together in a chain forms the protein molecule) They used transgenic mice to isolate two specific(different) strains of infectious prions. Elk, when exposed propogated identical infectious prions to the one they were initially exposed to and infected with, while deer did not.  They identify the specific site on the deer prion's amino acid sequence that varied when it was replicated within the host to the non-stable variant form.

What they don't provide evidence to support or refute is whether any of the variant infectious prions formed by the infected deer, while they remained alive, can be passed to man to cause disease. What the data do support is that prion replication variants are produced by the infected deer in their study,theoretically potentially broadening the array of infectious prion strains in host animals, plants and soils at an infection site.

As a researcher reviewing this study you have several options to build on what they determined: 1.) You can employ the exact same experimental protocol to attempt to verify the original researcher's conclusion(s), verifying that their findings were not a fluke. 2.) You can set-up an experiment to try and tease-out what happens at the specific nucleic acid sequence alteration site that causes the variant strain(s) of prion to form. 3.)You can design an experiment using deer as a host to determine whether the variant infectious prions that were formed continue to be altered biochemically during their replication sequence by the host animal to form additional prion strains to determine IF this is somehow specific to the deer species,or this was just unique to the original deer used in the initial experiment.
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Al the Infidel

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Re: CWD update: NIH study on prion transmission via plants
« Reply #7 on: January 17, 2017, 06:59:13 AM »

 :thmb:
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Al Johnson~ SEMPER FI

Dire Wolf

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Re: CWD update: NIH study on prion transmission via plants
« Reply #8 on: January 19, 2017, 08:29:53 AM »

Here is an overview of research that outlines a blood test that has been developed to determine prion infectious load in humans potentially exposed to "Mad Cow" disease, a prion-driven infection that closely parallels CWD occurring in cervids. The lack of significant false positives in serum samples tested is the most significant portion of this analysis technique.  Basically, you want a low incidence of folks who register as infected, when they are not; zero is much better...

http://cen.acs.org/articles/94/web/2016/12/Toward-blood-test-prion-disease.html
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